articles

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    Six things students can do to boost their mental health

    - by The Guardian

    It’s well-known that university can be a mental health pressure-cooker for students. Far from being the best years of their lives, many are lonely and being away from home can amplify academic, relationship and financial problems. A survey by the National Union of Students (NUS) in December found that the majority of students (78%) had experienced mental health issues in the last year, with a third saying they had had…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    The Lasting Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences

    - by Welldoing

    Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope is a new documentary directed by James Redford (son of Robert Redford) that explores the lasting impact of childhood stress and trauma. In the 1990s, Dr Vincent Filetti became interested in why patients at his obesity clinic consistently put the weight back on that they had lost. He started asking his patients more thorough questions and was amazed to discover…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    How to Keep from Turning into Your Parents

    - by Welldoing

    Welldoing has explored the experience and potential impact of a ‘me-me-me mother’ : when we are young and dependent upon our caregivers, we need to be narcissistic, while our care-givers should put their own needs and wants aside. In fact, if all goes well, we delight in our little ‘emperors’ or ‘empresses’ and (generally) take pleasure in meeting their demands. No baby or infant or child can look after itself…

  • General Health

    Major Depression: This New Type Could Account For One-Third of Sufferers

    - by Spring

    Inflammation in the brain could explain episodes of major depression in some people, new studies suggest. Around one-third of people experiencing major depression have high-levels of inflammation markers in their blood. This persistent inflammation could explain some of the worst symptoms of depression. The inability to feel pleasure — called anhedonia — is a particularly stubborn symptom. Depressed people often find it hard to experience pleasure from everyday activities like…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    The Hidden Pain of a Boarding School Childhood

    - by Welldoing

    “A ‘stiff upper lip’ can damage health, says Prince William,” ran Monday’s headlines. “Dad!” said my 12 year old. “The BBC is saying your book is bad for people!” It was the most surprising  endorsement to get, just a week after my book on boarding schools, abuse, separation trauma and the after-effects of all that was published. Prince William was speaking about male suicide, seen at stark first hand through…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    How Prince Harry Was Helped by Bereavement Counselling

    - by Welldoing

    Prince Harry’s decision to open up about having therapy as he struggled to come to terms with the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, has been heralded as a breakthrough moment in promoting the advantages of counselling to bereaved people. Prof Simon Wesseley, president of Royal College of Psychiatrists said that the prince’s podcast will make “a huge difference to the way we discuss grief. I think that…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    Why You Can’t Make it Alone

    - by Welldoing

    In the second century AD, the Roman emperor, Marcus Aurelius, wrote to himself in his Meditations: it is your duty to stand straight – not held straight. Aurelius, a Stoic, believed self-reliance, acceptance of what cannot be changed and clarity of thought to be of utmost importance and crucial to a fulfilling life. Much of his writing and the writing of other Stoics served the basis for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy…

  • Coaching

    Can You be a Confident Introvert?

    - by Welldoing

    Many introverts are confident people and introversion is not about lack of confidence, but characterises those who are more stimulated by internal thought than by external action and interaction. Where an introverted personality type might not actively seek and enjoy large social interactions, this is a preference rather than an aversion. They just prefer the solace of solitude, at least at regular intervals, to recharge their batteries. To a more…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    The Powerful Benefits of Reading Fiction

    - by Welldoing

    When was the last time you read a book, or a substantial online article? Do your daily reading habits streetch no further than tweets, mundane Facebook updates, or the cooking instructions of ready meals? If you’re one of countless people who refuse to make a habit of reading regularly, you might be missing out: reading fiction has all sorts of advantages. For a start, several studies reveal that reading fiction…

  • Counselling and Psychotherapy

    Is Your Childhood Sabotaging Your Relationships?

    - by Welldoing

    Many surveys indicate that January features high on the list of break ups and couples heading for the divorce courts. So perhaps it is timely to consider the choices we make when we are looking for a partner. We seek out people to whom we can attach ourselves over our lifetime. But we need to let go emotionally of our primary caregivers before we can form new secure attachments. I…